For those of us who remember when the BBC Micro was the home computer with the fastest Basic implementation available, a long time ago, and was pretty legendary in home computing circles in Europe. It didn't sell that much outside of the UK, mostly because of its price. It was also the target system for the original implementation of Elite. Matt Godbolt is building an emulator in JavaScript. First post of his series can be found here.

When it comes to Emacs, I am an amateur at best, but part of the fun is that I keep discovering new useful functionality.

It's one of those days, thanks to a hard disk going south I ended up having to rebuild the system drive on one of my machines. After putting the important software back on there - "Outlook and Emacs", as one of my colleagues calls it - I had to reapply some of the usual tweaks that make a generic developer workstation my developer workstation.

Admittedly I'm  not the biggest fan of git - I prefer Mercurial - but we're using it at work and it does a good job as a DVCS. However, we're mostly a Windows shop and the out of the box performance of Git for Windows is anything but stellar when you are using ssh as the transport for git. That's not too much bother with most of our repos but we have a couple of fairly big ones and clone performance with those matters.

I used to use Carbon Emacs on OS X for quite a while, but with the release of Emacs 24 I switched to the stock GNU Emacs distribution. While GNU Emacs works fine on OS X, once you throw a German keyboard layout in the mix it doesn't work so well as OS X uses Option + Number keys for a variety of characters needed for programming like [] and {}. GNU Emacs uses Option as Meta out of the box so the key mapping doesn't work overly well, especially if you do a lot of programming in the C family of languages.