The perils of buying a used computer - yes, I am too cheap or just not rich enough to buy a new Mac Pro - is that sometimes you find that you inherited "interesting" fixes.

As a bit of an RSS junkie - see previous post - I had to go look for alternatives to Google Reader. I've been a feedly user on and off for a few years but I was never that taken with it. It does seem to do mostly do what it says on the tin and having various tablet apps available for feedly is a good thing, but it tends to run into a few issues with high-volume feeds (craigslist feeds, I'm looking at you). Mind you, the reoccuring Craigslist feed issue seems to be more of an issue with Craigslist themselves than feedly.

The demise of Google reader viewed from a slightly different perspective. I find the analysis from someone who isn't a proto-geek but rather an investment professional  interesting, mainly because there are insights that some like me - who doesn't spend the whole day looking at companies and trying to figure out what they are doing as opposed to what they say they are doing - would and this case, have missed.

I was profiling some code a while ago that makes extensive use of boost::variant and one of the lessons from the profiler run was that boost variants appear to be fairly expensive to construct and copy.

I was trying to make Windows a little more Emacs-friendly (or was it the other way around?). First step was to enable the emacs server in my .emacs so I could make use of Emacs for quick and dirty editing tasks that require an editor better than Notepad but where the average Emacs startup time was just a little too long to make Emacs a viable alternative. A typical example would be to use Emacs as the editor for commit messages in Mercurial. A quick tweak of my global .hgrc provided me with an appropriate editor setting: