I try not to post too many metablogging posts. Other people do it better and I'm trying to focus on journalling what I learn as a software engineer and manager, not what tools I use for blogging. However after losing another post to WordPress's built-in editor I decided Something Must Be Done. I think this is only the second post I lost, but it's a fairly regular occurrence for a journalist friend of mine and I really don't have that much time to retype blog entries that ended up in Bit Nirvana.

Over on bitbashing.io, Matt Kline has an interesting blog post on how Shipping Culture is hurting us as an industry. Hop over there and read it now, because he addresses another case of the pendulum having swung too far. Your developers take a long time to get a new version out? I know, let's make them ship something half baked. Quality is overrated anyway. Especially when you don't have a reputation to lose as a maker of quality software.

We all know good people who can't get a job for some odd reason, but whenever I find myself on the other side of the table I am amazed at how people don't even bother to follow a couple of simple steps to massively increase your chances for a response. Yes, a lot of big companies seem to have their jobs email address hooked up directly to /dev/null but small companies still make up the majority of the software development landscape. With a small(er) company, there's a good chance that your email ends up directly with the hiring manager. Somebody like me, for example.

I encounter this on a fairly regular basis - a project uses a third-party library and there is either a bug in the library that we can't seem to avoid hitting, or there's a feature missing or not 100% ideal for our use case.

Debugging an intermittent problem with a some demo code in the Javascript BBC Master emulator. I love the hard core bit fiddling.