Debugging an intermittent problem with a some demo code in the Javascript BBC Master emulator. I love the hard core bit fiddling.

I recently blogged about installing a 64-bit build of Emacs for Windows because I was dealing with a bunch of large and very large files.

I grew up as a software developer on a steady diet of Dr Dobb's magazines. I was hooked the first time I came across an issue of the magazine as a student in the university library and for most of my career I have been a subscriber to it, until the print magazine was cancelled. I was sad to read this morning that after 38 years of publication, first in print and then on the web, the online edition has now met the same fate.

In a previous blog post I explained how you can substantially improve the performance of git on Windows updating the underlying SSH implementation. This performance improvement is very worthwhile in a standard Unix-style git setup where access to the git repository is done using ssh as the transport layer. For a regular development workstation, this update works fine as long as you keep remembering that you need to check and possibly update the ssh binaries after every git update.

In my previous post, I discussed various strategies for managing third party libraries. In this post I'll discuss a couple of techniques you can use to ensure that a specific version of your source code will get compiled with the correct version of the required libraries.