It might sound paradoxical, but in general, writing more code is easier than writing less code that accomplishes the same goals. Even if your code starts out clean, compact and beautiful, the code that is added later to cover the corner cases nobody thought of usually takes care of the code being well designed, elegant and beautiful. Agile programming offers a solution, namely constant refactoring, but who has time for that? That's why I occasionally give myself the 10% code reduction challenge and I encourage you to do the same.

A reader of this blog kindly pointed out that my instructions for building Emacs 25.1 on Ubuntu 16.10 result in a core dump when the build process bootstraps emacs. I only tested the instructions on 16.04 so I hadn't run into this issue yet.

Now that GNU Emacs 25.1 has been released, it is time for my customary "how to install Emacs 25.1 on a recent Ubuntu" post. In my case I'm using XUbuntu 16.04, but the instructions are pretty much the same for just about every recent Ubuntu version. The package versions of the referenced packages differ, but the package names haven't changed since I first published one of these posts.

This blog is self-hosted, together with some other services on a FreeBSD virtual server over at RootBSD. Yes, I'm one of those weirdos who hosts their own servers - even if they're virtual - instead of just using free or buying services.

I switched jobs in October last year and getting up to speed in the new role did take priority over anything else, so I had to put a few other endeavours including this blog on hold for a little while.

The Hack 2.0 font got a lot of attention recently as a font specifically designed for use with source code. So of course I had to try it out in Emacs. I started with installing it on Mac OS X as that's the OS I use most for work and work - like activities.