I've been doing a reasonable amount of Clojure development recently and like a lot of other Lisp dialect have marveled at the ease of separately pulling out the keys and values from a map. This is a very common operation after all, but C++ does only appear to support manual key or value extraction from a std::map.

Some security researchers from UCSD showed a proof of concept exploit via one of the dongles that appears to be also used by car insurance companies to monitor your driving "to give you discounts for good driving". I'm not really a fully paid up subscriber of the tin foil hat brigade but stuff like this makes me glad that I'm still opting for the old-fashioned way of paying for car insurance. Of course the fact that over half our fleet is too old to be OBD-II compliant may have some bearing on that as well...

Another metablogging post, but this may come in handy for people who like to produce blog posts in bulk and schedule them for publication in WordPress at a later date.

I've recently blogged about adding TLS support to Emacs 24.5 on Windows and improving git performance on Windows by installing an alternative git command line client. The reason I ended up investigating how to add SSL and TLS support to Emacs is that when I originally upgraded from the official git Windows client to the Git for Windows build, I ended up with non-working TLS support in Emacs.

Looks like Samsung and Google recognise that much like any other computing device, the smartphone in your pocket needs very regular security updates.